the story of avalokita

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The statue pictured above is Avalokita. This bodhisattva has several names – Chenrèzik, Lokésvara, Guanyin – and is sometime portrayed as a man and sometimes as a woman, but always represents a being who gazes down upon the world. Avalokita is the one who hears the cries of the suffering. She is the bodhisattva of compassion. The sun, moon, earth, wind and several Hindu deities are said to have been born of Avalokita – from her feet, her heart and her tears – and she is endowed with many arms because there are so many sufferers to reach out to. Associated with Avalokita is the seminal mantra om mani padme hum, the meaning of which, while interpreted many different ways, is a meditation on the practice of a path on which you can transform your body, speech, and mind into the pure exalted body, speech, and mind of a Buddha.

Known for her capacity to listen deeply, Avalokita is said to have practiced by listening tenderly to her own suffering, from which understanding and compassion arose. With the transformation and healing this brought, she was able to understand the suffering of others and help them to transform also.

We don’t like to connect with our suffering – we usually run in the opposite direction – but listening deeply to your own suffering paves the way to touch the suffering of another in communion. Eventually, one can touch the suffering of the world.

The best way to achieve this is by relaxing into a sangha or meditation group. The sangha will embrace you if you hold it dearly, and the collective energy of mindfulness and peace will penetrate you and spread through your body, releasing your pain.

I am aware of my suffering.
I embrace my suffering.
I am aware of the suffering of a loved one.
I embrace her pain.
I am aware of the violence, despair and fear in the world.
I embrace the world.
By touching my own pain, I can use my healing energy to transform
myself, my loved ones and the world.

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2 thoughts on “the story of avalokita

  1. I’ve known her as Avalokiteśvara – same dif, different name. Om Mani Padme Hum (The Jewel in the Lotus) has long been my go-to. I did not know all the details there, thanks for enlightening me.

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    1. Yes, I believe the eśvara is added to a name to signify lordly status. And there is so much more to her story – she defied her father’s wishes to marry her off, and she is said to have been very interested in the concept of emptiness. Thanks for piping up!

      Like

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